How much are fertility pills? We talk price for different brands

How Much Do Fertility Pills Cost? Check out our price guide below…

Cheaper fertility pills price= $9.99-$150

Higher end fertility pills= $1,500-$6,000

Check out these fertility pull options below

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Becoming pregnant can be a challenge for some couples. There are many options to increase the success rate of conceiving a child, some of which are fertility pills. Fertility drugs regulate or stimulate ovulation. Fertility drugs generally work like the natural hormones — follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) — to trigger ovulation. They’re used in women who ovulate to try to stimulate a better egg or an extra egg(s). Fertility drugs may include Clomiphene citrate (taken orally), Gonadotropins (injected), Metformin (taken orally), Letrozole (taken orally), and Bromocriptine (taken orally).

Typical costs:
· CLOMIPHENE (Clomid): helps women ovulate (produce a mature egg) during their cycle. According to GoodRx.com the most common version of clomiphene is around $30.72, 74% off the average retail price of $118.44. On average, clomid ranges from $9 to $150, depending on dosage and if you’re using generic or brand name.

· GONADOTROPINS: these injected treatments stimulate the ovary directly to produce multiple eggs. Gonadotropin fertility medicines contain follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), or both. The lowest GoodRx price for the most common version of gonadotropins is around $113.64, 64% off the average retail price of $319.60. On average, a cycle of gonadotropins costs from $1,500 to $6,000, depending on what medications are prescribed and how much you need.

· METFORMIN (Glucophage): used when insulin resistance is a suspected cause of infertility, usually in women with a diagnosis of PCOS. Metformin helps improve insulin resistance, which can improve the likelihood of ovulation. According to GoodRx.com, the lowest price for the most common version of metformin is around $4.00, 85% off the average retail price of $27.31. If using the Drugs.com discount card, which is accepted at most U.S. pharmacies, the cost for metformin oral tablet 500 mg is around $11 for a supply of 14 tablets, depending on the pharmacy you visit.

· LETROZOLE (Femara): an aromatase inhibitor and works in a similar fashion to clomiphene to induce ovulation. According to GoodRx.com, the price for the most common version of letrozole is around $12.51, 95% off the average retail price of $310.07. If using the Drugs.com discount card, the cost for letrozole oral tablet 2.5 mg is around $27 for a supply of 30 tablets, depending on the pharmacy you visit.

· BROMOCRIPTINE (Cycloset): a dopamine agonist, used when ovulation problems are caused by excess production of prolactin (hyperprolactinemia) by the pituitary gland. According to GoodRx.com, the price for the most common version of bromocriptine is around $45.85, 65% off the average retail price of $134.52. If using the Drugs.com discount card, which is accepted at most U.S. pharmacies, the cost for bromocriptine oral capsule 5 mg is around $204 for a supply of 30 capsules, depending on the pharmacy you visit.

Check out this video on the good and the bad fertility pills

Shopping for Fertility Pills:
· Seek out a fertility specialist (reproductive endocrinologist). This physician practices a sub-specialty of obstetrics and gynecology called reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI). REI is an area of medicine that addresses hormonal functioning as it pertains to reproduction and infertility in both women and men.

· Be patient. Many women require several attempts with various fertility drugs before pregnancy occurs.

· While there are many over-the-counter fertility pills being sold, if you have someone who’s not ovulating or there’s no sperm, these pills won’t work. It is recommended to see your ob-gyn if you haven’t gotten pregnant after six months of actively trying.

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